Discover a heartwarming young adult novel in Everett Beich’s, ‘Empty Mansion Empty Heart’

By the age of nineteen, Tyler loses both his mother and father, inherits his family home, and becomes the owner and operator of the family grocery store that he turns into a thriving business.  When the business is threatened by the construction of a shopping center along his small town’s only highway, Tyler must take matters into his own hands to preserve what he and his family have built. In an attempt to buy up the surrounding land with the help of the townspeople, Tyler befriends the town “witch,” Mary, who lives in just two rooms of a large, empty mansion on the outskirts of town. When he acquires the mansion under unusual circumstances, he becomes the youngest, richest, and most eligible bachelor in town.  But just when it seems he has everything, Tyler, alone and coping with the loss of both his parents and Mary, decides to leave town in search of something greater: true love.

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Everett Beich was born in St. Paul, Minnesota and raised in Kulm, North Dakota. After working in real estate and owning a grocery store, he moved with his family to California.

During his lifetime, he has worn many hats. He helped start a successful chain of banks in northern California. He has owned and operated a mobile home dealership, which was the top seller of mobile homes in the state of California. He owns 5-star mobile home parks in Chico, California. He owns homes in California and Idaho and an RV lot in Montana. Now retired, he likes to golf and travel in his motor home, keeping him and his wife busy.

But what he likes to do most is tell stories. This is his first of four novels that will be released in the next few years.

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AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING eBOOK RETAILERS!

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Review of Marti Healy’s ‘The Secret Child’

ImageThe Secret Child by Marti Healy
Review by Sinead F.

The Secret Child, coming in at 196 pages, should not be dismissed as lacking in content. This was another one of those books where I had never heard of the author or the book beforehand, so it was a little bit of a risk but I am so glad I took a chance on it!

Set in South Carolina in 1855, The Secret Child follows the escapades of Marika, a young girl who is a member of the Irish Travelling Community. The book opens with Marika and her brother’s journey to another clan within the community, as Marika has been promised in marriage to the clan’s leader. However, things soon go awry as her brother falls ill and is taken in by some villagers near to where Marika’s new clan resides. Marika then makes the decision to abandon her arranged marriage, at least temporarily, and takes refuge in a nearby forest. She soon finds herself drawn into a mystical world, which she had previously only heard of in stories.

With regards to the story as a whole, I enjoyed it. Oddly enough, the simplistic story didn’t detract from my enjoyment of the book as a whole. The reason this book still stands up as a whole is a result of the beautiful, lyrical descriptions that are peppered throughout every chapter. Something as simple as winter changing to spring was imagined as a symphony of growth and color that really drew you into the setting of the book and added a feeling of magic to otherwise ordinary happenings.

Despite how much I loved the descriptions in this book, they never took over. I remember when reading Homer’s Odyssey, another book with wonderful descriptions, there would be pages and pages of descriptions of one particular setting or key object before anything would actually happen, which turned it from a thing of beauty to tedium. The Secret Child manages to avoid this pitfall and uses the descriptions to either draw you in at the start of a chapter or enhance the events within the chapter.

An interesting aspect of The Secret Child is, naturally, Marika’s Irish heritage. At times throughout the book, Marika slips into speaking Gaeilge [in Irish], which I felt was a particularly nice touch. However, understanding Irish is not necessary anyway as all her phrases are translated on the page!

Due to the setting of The Secret Child, it is impossible for the story to be told without reference to slavery or the upcoming civil war. Again, these themes do not take over the story, but they are present throughout. Marika struggles to understand the motivations of slave owners, as her clan did not partake in slavery so she had never experienced it before. The book briefly touches on the cruelty of some slave owners, as well as some of the laws regarding slavery. This stood as a good contrast to the magical world Marika inhabited, as it brought a stark view of reality to the forefront.

In general, I really enjoyed reading The Secret Child. It’s a great book for immersing yourself into another world. The Secret Child shows you a world that exists just out of reach, and then drags you right into the middle of it. All in all, a beautiful read.